Wiamina D opalanie

How Much Do You Really Know About Vitamin D?

Sunny vitamin D hides many secrets. Get to know them all and take care of your health. Vitamin D directly affects the health of bones, teeth, immunity, and the work of the entire body.

Find out about its role in tanning

In this post, we would like to draw your attention to the importance of vitamin D, and in turn the sun, for our health. Sunbathing is not only a form of improving appearance. It is a way to fight many diseases and improve the mental condition, which should be specially taken care of in the time of a pandemic. Attention, there will be a large dose of knowledge … 🙂

Sunny vitamin

Vitamin D3 has been called the «sunny vitamin» for a reason. This happened due to the fact that it is produced by the human body thanks to the radiation of sunlight. Not everyone knows that in order to maintain a proper level of vitamin D3, UVB radiation is necessary, it can provide as much as 90% of the requirement for this ingredient. The fact is, without the sun, we cannot get enough vitamin D3. For this reason, for your own health and wellbeing, you should catch the sun’s rays as often as possible — outdoors and also inside the solarium.

Why is it worth taking care of the proper level of vitamin D3 in the body?

The greatest risk of vitamin D3 deficiency in the body are diseases of the skeleton, periodontics and circulatory system. An adequate level of vitamin D3 supports immunity and reduces the risk of cancer development. The sun vitamin is essential for the absorption of calcium and phosphorus, which are the building blocks of healthy bones and teeth. Did you know that it has such a big influence on our bodies?

Vitamin D sources

The human body is able to independently «produce» as much as 90% of the vitamin D3 requirement. Its natural synthesis takes place in the outer layers of the skin and is due to the action of ultraviolet radiation (UVB) from sunlight. In order for the production to start and the shortages to be replenished, regular sun exposure (revealing at least 18% of the body) is necessary. Unfortunately, with today’s lifestyle, due to work and the amount of time spent indoors,  most of us do not have the opportunity to take advantage of many sunbathing sessions, let alone regular ones. The situation is also not improved by the latitude in which we live and atmospheric factors (smog, cloud cover). There is simply not enough sun in our lives, even in the spring and summer seasons. As a result, the majority of society is deficient in vitamin D3, and the number of diseases and complications is constantly growing. For this reason, it is worth supporting yourself with regular visits to the solarium in the autumn and winter period. In the warmer months of the year, combine visiting solariums with outdoor exposure.

The advantages of natural supplementation include no risk of overdose, improved mood, and aesthetic value — a beautiful tan.

The remaining 10% of the demand, i.e. a significant minority, can be provided to the body with supplements and an appropriate diet. However, it should be remembered that most of the food contains very small amounts of it. Foods that are rich in it: fish liver oils, sea fish, and margarine. Smaller amounts can be found in eggs and dairy products, offal, poultry, and mushrooms. The use of dietary supplements is also not enough. These foods can only help you maintain adequate vitamin D3 levels in your body.

For the inquisitive: the synthesis of vitamin D3

Vitamin D3 synthesis — the formation of provitamin D3 is the result of the action of ultraviolet rays from the B Band (290-315 nm). It is a process that involves the destruction of a cholesterol derivative molecule and giving it a different form, which our liver is able to process in a safe and natural way into the active form of vitamin D3 if needed. In another process, taking place in the kidneys, the active form of vitamin D3 is converted into an even more active form called calcitriol. This is what controls the work of most of our genes.

Share this post:

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin

More to read: